Jujutsu

Sosuishi-ryu Jujutsu

Jujutsu, the predecessor of Aikido and Judo, is the oldest of the Japanese Martial Arts. Unlike Judo, which emphasizes sport, Jujutsu is an aggressive form of self defense consisting of disabling kicks or strikes to vital points, locks or grips to incapacitate the opponent or to cause dislocation or fracture, strangulations, pushes, pulls and throws to bring the opponent into a position where he is rendered immobile. Ideally, all these maneuvers employ, the principle of using the opponent’s weight and momentum, and of retreating, and sidestepping to bring him off balance.

The system of Jujutsu taught at the New York Seibukan is Sosuishi-ryu, which was founded in 1650 by a samurai of Bungo Takeda named Futagami Hannosuke Masaaki, a master of Takenouchi-ryu and many other schools. He taught another samurai of Bungo Takeda; Matahichi Shitama, whose family, whether by direct lineage or by adoption have been masters of this art for centuries. In 1877, Munetsuga Shitama, the 12th inheritor of Sosuishi-ryu was killed in a rebellion led by General Saigo of Satsuma.On July 24, 1905, Kibei Aoyagi, the 14th inheritor, attended a meeting in Kyoto at which the masters of various Jujutsu schools gathered with Jigoro Kano, the founder of Judo, to decide the techniques of Kodokan Judo.

There is no sport aspect in Sosuishi-ryu Jujutsu, for it is true Bujutsu (Art of the Warrior). That is, it is composed of realistic self defense techniques. The class consists of Ukemi (break falls), Atemi-waza (striking techniques), Kansetsu-waza (techniques of twisting and breaking of joints), Nage-waza (throwing techniques), and Kata (forms) that are unchanged for 350 years.